Proximity Readers for Access Control Systems

When looking at how you actually unlock a door, it's typically through a wall or door-mounted reader. At first glance, door access readers all seem the same. The main differences I would say are how they connect to the access control system (either on-premise in the IT room, or cloud-based) via wireless or wired connection - or not at all. But another factor is power supply - either they are battery powered, low voltage connected or "power over ethernet" (PoE) - more about that below. 

In the end you can think of readers as four different categories.

Reader Types

There are many more details to understand about door access readers (or commonly called "proximity readers") but if you take away one thing from this guide about readers it should be how readers are categorized.

Here are details about the four types of proximity readers in more depth:


Standalone proximity readers

Sometimes those readers are called "panel free" because they are fully de-centrally installed. Think about it like programming a PIN code for each individual person on each individual reader - it's a great option for very small "quick fix" kind of installations but will generally increase the complexity: You have to go to each and every reader to test and activate the card, you cant control access in real time but would need to deactivate the card on each reader. That's why they often come with PIN pads. 

Kisi's opinion: We don't see anyone using these readers, however they are still being recommended by local locksmiths and integrators. Stay away. 
Standalone proximity reader without central control panel

Standalone proximity reader without central control panel

 

Wireless proximity readers

Think about hotels - those readers you see on the locks are wireless readers. This means they are not wired to power (battery operated) and you don't have a wired data connection. Typically in the hallways you might see some small access points made by the same brand as the wireless readers - and sometimes the locks itself. That's how the locks connect to an online environment: Via RF (radio frequency) they communicate on a power saving protocol to this access point which is itself connected to the internet. That way you don't have to physically connect each lock but at the same time have real time updated information.

Kisi's opinion: If you don't have 50+ doors, don't even think about doing it. Someone has to update all the batteries in the locks. 
 

Proximity readers (prox readers)

Proximity readers or commonly called "prox readers" are the most frequently used type of reader in commercial environments. They are universally compatible with pretty much any access control systems, since they typically communicate on a protocol invented around 1974, named "Wiegand Protocol". Conforming to the lowest possible standard comes with the problem that each of those prox readers have been hacked and can be hacked by anyone who follows instructions. Here are some examples: Hack HID, Copy a prox ID card or the Wiegand vulnerability.

Kisi's opinion: Proximity readers are a great "default" for standard environments. However they lack more advanced options which allow for scaleability, security and future readiness.
HID reader family - a common proximity reader

HID reader family - a common proximity reader

 
Kisi's IP connected reader - reads secure cards, iOS and Android Apps

Kisi's IP connected reader - reads secure cards, iOS and Android Apps

IP readers (IP connected proximity readers)

Currently the most advanced version of readers - due to their IP connectivity, they can be fully integrated into IT environments. Also data traffic to and from those readers can be controlled and secured easier. Think about the installation similar to any CCTV camera. 

Kisi's opinion: Well we decided to build an IP reader but the reason why we did it is because it is what proximity readers are not: integrateable, future proof, manageable at scale and secure.

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Credits

Written by Bernhard Mehl - edit suggestions? email support"at"getkisi.com

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